Confederate Major Anderson’s fight with two Federals at the Battle of Paducah

Confederate Major Anderson’s fight with two Federals at the Battle of Paducah

Here is a recorded account describing a pistol and saber fight between Major Charles W. Anderson, an aide on the staff of Nathan B. Forrest, and two Federal soldiers on the streets of Paducah on March 25th, 1864.  This account was written by Capt. B. L. Ridley from Murfreesboro, TN., which was described to him at the home of Major Anderson in Florence Depot, TN., and was recorded in the Confederate Veteran Magazine, Volume 4, in 1896 on pages 358-59. Major Anderson told the story, at first, as if he were a witness to the events, but he later identifies himself as the Confederate Officer in this fight. Afterwards, there is another account written by J. V. Grief in Confederate Veteran Magazine, Volume 5, page 4.

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General Forrest’s Raid on Paducah by Confederate Soldier J. V. Grief

General Forrest’s Raid on Paducah by Confederate Soldier J. V. Grief

This is an account of the Battle of Paducah by resident and a former soldier in Paducah’s Confederate 3rd Kentucky Mounted Infantry, Company D, in Confederate Veteran Magazine, Volume 5, and was published in 1897:

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Colonel Lloyd Tilghman’s meeting with Union Colonel Prentiss, May 6th, 1861

Colonel Lloyd Tilghman’s meeting with Union Colonel Prentiss, May 6th, 1861

Kentucky State Militia Colonel Lloyd Tilghman’s meeting with Union Colonel Benjamin M. Prentiss, the commander of the Union Headquarters at Camp Defiance, Cairo, Illinois, on May 6th, 1861.

Source: Chicago Tribune and N.Y. Evening Post, May 11, 1861 recorded in The Rebellion Record: A Diary of American Events, Moore and Everett, Vol 1, Doc. 139, 1861, pgs. 194-195.

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How Paducah, Kentucky got its name

FeaturedHow Paducah, Kentucky got its name

A common story told in the Paducah area is that William Clark, of the Lewis and Clark fame, named Paducah for a Chickasaw chieftain called Chief Paduke, but this is incorrect. Clark was actually referring to a tribe he learned about during his travels exploring the west.

In a letter to his son on April 27, 1827, Clark wrote:

“I expect to go to the mouth of the Tennessee River, and be absent about two weeks. I have laid out a town there and intend to sell some lots in it, the name is Paducah, one of the largest Indian nations known in this country, and now almost forgotten.”

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Davy Crockett and the coon skin trick

Davy Crockett and the coon skin trick

On October 19, 1818, the Jackson Purchase areas between the Mississippi and the Tennessee Rivers were included in the land treaty between the United States and the Chickasaw Indian Nation including the parts of Tennessee between these rivers down to the Mississippi line. One of the early pioneers into this area was Davy Crockett.

While he was stumping for congress in his frontier Weakley County, Tennessee district in 1835, Davy Crockett relates a story about how a coon skin trick helped him get elected.

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To have served under Lafayette

To have served under Lafayette

This is a story about my 5th great grandfather David Cashon and how he served as a soldier in the Revolutionary War. David was 18 years old when he enlisted to serve as a minuteman serving out of Chesterfield County, Virginia in 1775, and by the end of the war, he had the fortune of serving under General Marquis de Lafayette and also was at the Siege of Yorktown.

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