The Battle of Shiloh from the Confederate Army’s Perspective

I am in the process of researching Paducah, Kentucky’s 3rd Confederate Infantry as it fought during the Battle of Shiloh and later throughout the war. To do so, I have been using a Civil War tactical game called, Ultimate General: Civil War, and in the video below, the perspective of the Battle of Shiloh is the Confederacy and the choices it had while attacking the Union forces on April 6th, 1862. This video was created by Agrippa Maxentius on YouTube.

I am using this video to follow all of the 3rd Confederate’s movement on that day to get a better idea of the geography and forces arrayed against their brigade, and I am posting the video to give the reader my thought process as I study the landscape and the battle in detail. I am also studying the exact topography maps of the battlefield to be able to track the movements of the brigade to make sure this map on the game will be able to hold up to scrutiny. Check out this link from the Civil War Trust highlighting the Battle of Shiloh.

Future articles will be posted giving the exact movements of the Third Confederate Infantry and its soldiers from Paducah, Kentucky, so stay tuned for more.

Here is the video:

The Battle of Shiloh from a new strategic video game, Ultimate General: Civil War

I am a big fan of strategic games like Total War, and I have discovered a new game coming out called, Ultimate General: Civil War. I watch other fans of this genre that record their battles on YouTube. This video is from Agrippa Maxentius on YouTube, which shows his Battle of Shiloh. I wanted to share with you how I use tactical maneuvers that I learn while reading my history books in these games to see if they work as it was recorded. I hope you enjoy this video:

The Cashon family of Western Kentucky and how Dukedom, Kentucky got its name

The Cashon family of Western Kentucky and how Dukedom, Kentucky got its name

In the Jackson Purchase, and especially in the Graves County region of the state, there will be seen a large number of people with the name Cashon. This is attributed to the one man and his son that brought this family to the region early in America’s history.

In 1824, David Cashon, my fifth great-grandfather, settled in the region from his migration from Virginia, North Carolina, and Tennessee with his son, Pleasant Jackson Cashon, my fourth great-grandfather. His story is an interesting one because he received a Revolutionary War land grant to settle into the Jackson Purchase in 1824, and in 1832, he petitioned to receive a pension for his service in the war. When one reviews the genealogy records of the Cashon family in Western Kentucky, they will find that they all have this singular ancestor, and they will discover that all of the Cashon’s are directly related. Here are the contents of this petition:

Continue reading “The Cashon family of Western Kentucky and how Dukedom, Kentucky got its name”